David Stubbs reviews the singles of the week, 6th May 1989

Stubbs is, as always, very good value in these reviews. Interesting to note Stubbs take on the Motown resurections of Sam Brown. One can only wonder what Mr. Agreeable would have thought of Amy Winehouse. It would be great if I could compile Spotify playlists for all the tracks featured in these singles of the week review posts but sadly it’s really hard to find more than 50% of the tracks featured. That said, given Stubbs reviews of most of the records here, maybe that’s a good thing? Well I’ve grabbed what I can so judge for yourself (if you have Spotify) here’s the Singles of the week, 6th May 1989 playlist. Yes, the Robert Palmer track is fucking dreadful.

p.s. I’ve got that Telescopes single on 12″

p.p.s. I saw It Bites live around ’87 and the 16 year old me was very impressed by the guitar skills of the singer *hangs head in shame*

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Simon Reynolds reviews The Telescopes live at The Falcon, 6th May 1989

Simon Reynolds reviews The Telescopes live at The Falcon, 6th May 1989. Photo Stephen Sweet.

Well, well…a review you can read without having to click to enlarge. Enjoy.

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Everett True reviews the singles of the week, 22nd January 1990

Correctly called ET. Blue Thunder is still a fucking gem. And yes, Shine On isn’t all that but I’m not sure I’d have been that dismissive. Other than that there’s proof that not everything McGee touched turned to gold with a review for The Times – remember them? And to the oh so punk Child Molesters – do you feel stupid now?

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whatever-happened-to-shoegazing-part-2-12th-september-1992

Clearly it’s less of an investigation and more of an excuse to let Moose promote their new single by distancing themselves from their past, but that aside, I feel a bit of a rant coming on.

It’s a funny thing how occasionally this blog stirs passions and personal recollections about things I’d long since forgotten. I’m aware that there are some (most) people that read this blog who know a lot more about the history of these things and can express them a lot better than I can, however, I was there and this is my personal take on shoegaze.

Back in the day…way back 1988 or so, it was the early ‘proto-shoegaze’ bands that really got their hooks in me. Sure we’d all grown up with The Smiths and The Fall and other Peel favourites but these weren’t new bands, they weren’t undiscovered bands and crucially, a lot of them I didn’t really like them that much. However with burgeoning maturity [cough], a growing confidence and money from summer/Saturday jobs I found myself blowing meagre wages on more and more of the latest music press raves.

These days it’s hard to try and impress how difficult it was to find out about, let alone hear, ‘indie’ music, if you lived in a small market town like I did. Even if you knew what you wanted, and you had the money to afford it, you still had to order it out of a tiny Our Price stacked to the gills with CD’s of Dire Straights, U2, Sting etc… There was no flicking through heaps of tantalizing vinyl, no studying the artwork and turning your fingers lustily across the records cardboard stock. Buying records in those days was just an alternative form of gambling.

You’d walk into Our Price on Saturday. You’d endure the withering stare of some fool, a few years older than you, who thought they were fucking cool because they worked in a record shop. You’d write down your order on a little bit of paper, say thank you and leave. You’d go back after about a week, be intimidated all over again but with luck, you’d pick up a copy of  a record which you’d never even seen the cover of before. You’d take it home with mounting anticipation. You’d put it on, close your eyes and wait. You’d wait for the sound of “1,000 volcano’s erupting over 10,000 vestal virgins” that you’d read about; the sound of “skipping naked through cornfields on the first day of summer” that you’d been promised. You’d hear the needle crackling, here it comes…and you’d think… “God that sounds shit”.

Yeah…nine times out of ten the record would be total shit. But you played it to death anyway because you only had a few records and it had just cost you £6.99. Sometimes you grew to like it but you never quite loved it. But then, just occasionally, you did. Sometimes what came back through the speakers made up for every single dud you’d bought up to that point. And as depressing and uncool as it sounds today, for me, some of those records were Ride’s first EP’s.

There had been others before Ride obviously. Some have stood the test of time, some haven’t, The Stone Roses & The Eight Legged Groove Machine. But it was that trilogy of EP’s Ride released in 1990 that really got under my skin.  For a while nothing could touch Ride. I knew the lineage. The Mary Chain to My Bloody Valentine to Ride. Each band aping the one before it but in some intangible way, moving things forward, being original. Many scoffed but the fact is Ride made ‘noise’ palatable to me where JAMC and MBV had failed. Sure I’d kinda liked those other ‘cooler’ bands but I hadn’t loved them. Ride I loved and I wasn’t the only one. They had better tunes, better cheekbones and perfect hair. They were everything I wanted to be and Taste almost broke the Top 10, which back then was quite extraordinary. And while we were still inthrall to Ride, Slowdive overlapped these releases with a clutch of similar yet different EP’s which were just as engaging. Then, Chaperhouse – then, as I remember it – all hell broke loose and there were  1,000’s of bands all trying to do what Ride/Slowdive did but successively diluting the quality.

I hate ‘scenes’. I don’t mind broad genres of music, they’re helpful, but scenes serve no one in the long run. The bands that really stand out, who are doing something original, attract imitators. Very quickly there’s a whole bunch of bands that all seem to be doing the same thing. It feels exciting at the beginning. It feels like someone’s bottled youth. The bandwagon begins. Journalists scrabble to cover the new movement. New bands align themselves to this new exciting scene in a brazen attempt to get noticed and kick start their career. The more ferocious the scene becomes, the uncooler it gets. The original bands distance themselves from the sound that’s brought them their success then typically struggle to sell as many records as they used to. The third, fourth and fifth generation imitators can no longer look to anyone to copy and their records have all the substance of the froth from the top of a milkshake. The scene has imploded. The snide bitching begins. That once cool scene moniker becomes a term of abuse. You’ve passed from teenager to twenty something. You feel let down, disappointed. It’s a new feeling. Odd. Strange. You still love those records that were once so cool yet are now so derided. Future cynicism germinates.

So it was the summer of 1991 that Melody Maker invented the The Scene That Celebrates Itself – their own version, which never really caught on – of NME’s Shoegaze, which did. Originally a term of celebration, by the end of 1992 it was all over. And the mud remains slung to this day.

All of which is a flabby, over long preamble to try and justify why I hate the fact that Ride get called Shoegaze. To me Shoegaze is a term of abuse for all those shit also-ran bands. Catherine Wheel? Yeah sure. Chapterhouse? Definitely. Ocean Colour Scene before they jumped on the next bandwagon, abso-fucking-lutely! But My Bloody Valentine, The House of Love, Lush, Ride? FUCK NO! Apparently I’m wrong. Ride were definitely Shoegaze. Simon Price has told me so and well…that’s that isn’t it? Thing is I can’t see how you retrospectively apply a scene to bands who were around a long time before the scene existed. I know, I know…I’m *so* naive.

So what did happen to Shoegazing?  Well the truth is it didn’t die but became [yawn] nu-gaze. I’m not sure when the revival – jokingly predicted to start in 1995 – did start exactly but it’s been mutating and evolving in its own quiet way for years now, as this 2005-present Last.Fm list of forum post attests.

This morning, quite unrelated to this I was sent a link to a youtube video.  I couldn’t quite believe my eyes. Or ears. It’s like the last 19 years didn’t happen. This was released in February 2009 – and in case there’s any doubt – this IS Shoegaze. If you like this go buy those first 3 Ride EP’s kids. Or failing that, Ecstasy & Wine by My Bloody Valentine.

Update 13th April: Thanks to comment left by David M who highlighted this modern day article by Paul Lester on the same topic. Still don’t agree with much of it but at least Moose aren’t plugging a single.

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Sharon O’ Connell reviews The Telescopes live at The Powerhaus, 20th January 1990.

More Telescopes from the same Melody Maker as the previous interview along with an ad for a Birdland single…another ‘nearly’ band that I never got into.

The Powerhaus has been a long time out of business though. I remember going a few times as a student back in 1989/90 and then having to face the drag of a 2am night bus journey back to south London. I work in Islington now and can’t recall quite which building it was in. Before the turning to Chappel Market or just after? Robin??

Dug out Taste this evening and have ripped I fall, She screams for your listening pleasure.

Finally, the prize for today’s most bizarre Google search resulting in 2 visits to this blog goes to “lily allen dinosaur wellies”

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Steve Sutherland interviews The Telescopes, 20th January 1990

Steve Sutherland interviews The Telescopes, 20th January 1990. Photo by Tom Sheehan.

I bloody loved The Telescopes – another, if not the, most underrated band from this period – they really should have had more success than they did. I can only put that down to the fact that they were so hard to categorise….they were a bit Mary Chain, a bit Loop and bit sixties pop yet nothing like any of them really and then they changed tack once they signed to Creation which I think threw a lot of people.

I loved the first album Taste  – it’s such a heavy record and the overpowering noise really makes the songs. If you can get past the cacophony of noise and feedback you’re left with the most incredibly melodic pop songs with some truly stunning vocal harmonies –  She Screams, I Fall etc. which in turn then allows you to appreciate the layers of noise that have been added.

They did seem to drift into the baggy thing slightly once signed to Creation and maybe those coming to the band fresh just saw them as another Soupdragons – especially with those multicoloured videos. The songs and melodies were still good but I guess their moment had passed. I saw them at The Underworld in Camden around this time (supported by Bang Bang Machine who played the sublime Geek Love incidentally) and they all seemed so fed up and sick of being in the band. Steve sat down and smoked a spliff through one of the longer instrumental sections at one point in the gig and in a small, less than full venue, it was hard not to feel sorry for him – a gifted songwriter unjustly overlooked. I can still remember it all pretty clearly so it must have affected me.

According to wikipedia the band are still together, albeit in a stripped down form and pursuing a different musical direction but Taste was re-issued in 2006 and if you like noisey pop/rock then you should track down a copy. The Telescopes critical rehabilitation starts here.

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